American Cancer Society Report is Misleading; younger women getting more triple negative, estrogen positive & HER2+ breast cancers

Women of childbearing age, in many states around the U.S. today, face historically high invasive breast cancer levels. The American Cancer Society’s (ACS’) recent study, published Feb 22, in the American Association for Cancer Research, is incorrect when it says breast cancer rates are not changing for younger women.

In Massachusetts, younger women (under 50), saw a 45% increase in invasive breast cancer between 1995-2007; younger women in Colorado saw a 27% increase between 1990-2008, and younger women in Florida saw a 40% increase between 1984-2008.

The American Cancer Society’s February, 2011 report doesn’t count the actual number of women diagnosed in each state; instead, it uses an estimate, based on a formula, based on 9% of the U.S. population.

To know the real story, we need to count every woman who is affected, and we need to have those numbers published for all of us to see and understand.

Contact you state cancer board and ask them how many younger women developed invasive breast cancers last year, compared to the past five or ten years. Also ask them, how many of these younger women were diagnosed with triple negative, HER2+ and estrogen receptor positive breast cancers.

We need this specific information, not estimates. Keeping women in the dark when it comes to these critical numbers, makes it impossible to measure any positive changes, as women try easy and healthy ways to stop breast cancer before it starts.

U. S. Breast Cancer Epidemic Hitting Young Moms and Other Women of Childbearing Age

In   2009, about 62,520 women of childbearing age in the United States were diagnosed with invasive breast cancer.  This is a whopping 41% increase from 2001, when approximately 44, 300 women of childbearing age were reportedly diagnosed with the disease, according to recent American Cancer Society statistics.

These younger American women are being hit with triple negative, HER2 positive and estrogen positive breast cancers; diseases  that usually maim, sometimes kill and often bankrupt a woman’s current and future financial situation.

In recent years young media leaders and celebrities have shared their personal breast cancer diagnoses, including Fox News political reporter Jennifer Griffin (triple negative); ABC’s Good Morning America host,  Robin Roberts (triple negative); National Public Radio’s Tavis Smiley Show Executive Producer,  Sheryl Flowers, who died from triple negative breast cancer in 2009 at the age of 42, folksinger Melissa Ethridge (HER2 positive) and film star, Christina Applegate.

Why is this new epidemic happening to our younger women? How can younger women help stop breast cancer from happening to them ever… or never again?

For more information on why younger women in the U.S. are facing this current breast cancer epidemic, and for specific ways each woman can help lower her risk of developing breast cancer ever… or never again, sign on to The Truth About Breast Cancer blog  http://www.thetruthaboutbreastcancer.com
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